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Unchecking Follow Host for Live Performance  

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SSquared
(@ssquared)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 61
October 2, 2020 3:39 am  

I just watched the latest video release today and realized there is a key feature I have overlooked for playing Live.  John mentioned saving BPM when saving patches and, though I've seen it, it never hit me how this resolves a big annoyance I have.  When using delay or chorus/delay effects, changing tempo becomes a real issue in my DAW.  When we end one song and transition to the next, the tempo change causes the previous sound fade to change delay and can go up/down in pitch.  Typically I stop playing before the song ends so my sound fades out in time.  Then I change tempo.  I'm guessing others have run into this same problem.

Recently I started using BPM/Delay charts and manually assigning the necessary millisecond delay value.  It's a hassle, but baked the tempo into the patch itself.

With Unify, I can now go to the Transport controls, uncheck "Follow Host" and set a tempo.  This is HUGE for me.  I think I have been purposely checking "Follow Host" so it would follow my DAW and completely overlooked the benefit of unchecking this option.  Since we play to a click track, we always play the songs at the same tempo, so saving the BPM with the patch will really be a massive help for me.  THANK YOU for this feature.

Ableton Live 10, Omnisphere, Native Instruments, Diva, SynthMaster, Alchemy 1.55, Addictive Keys, Unify


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getdunne
(@getdunne)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1314
October 2, 2020 8:04 pm  

@ssquared

Note that Follow Host only matters when running Unify inside a DAW. For most live work, I would think you could use the Unify stand-alone app, where every BPM patch automatically sets the tempo when it loads.

Is there any reason you're using Unify in a DAW for live work? Which DAW? Are there specific features of that DAW which, if we could add comparable things to Unify, would allow you to work stand-alone?


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SSquared
(@ssquared)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 61
October 3, 2020 12:58 am  

Yes.  Unify standalone is well suited for live use.  The way I've described it is by setting up layers set to different MIDI channels and then use your keyboard controller to switch MIDI channel.  I find workstations much more suitable to this than most general controllers these days.  This is what I'm used to with years of hardware synths, so I kind of translated that same idea to software.  That is, the concept of using MIDI channels to change your sound.  I've mentioned it elsewhere, but patch changes won't work for me.  I pre-load all of my sounds so everything is ready to go with no hiccups when I switch sounds.

Posted by: @getdunne

Is there any reason you're using Unify in a DAW for live work? Which DAW? Are there specific features of that DAW which, if we could add comparable things to Unify, would allow you to work stand-alone?

The main reason for me is the integration of the Native Instruments S61 MK2 with Ableton Live.  I would be giving up too much to use Unify standalone.  The biggest feature I use is the mixer view where I can see 8 tracks at a time, I see volume meters and can control the volume right there.  I can clearly see the name of the track (something like "SYN - Song Name").  Like I mentioned in another thread, adding something like an arm track* option would kind of provide something similar through the MK2's MIDI panel and using CC's.  Imagine clicking the keyboard's top button and it switches the track/sound and the bottom knob is used for the volume.  I would lose out on the volume meter and the text is limited in the MIDI panel, but it could potentially be a solution for use with NI keyboards.  If there was a way to simulate the Ableton API and have the S61 think it's talking to Live, then that would be ideal.  😀

> Which DAW?

I use Ableton Live.

The other issue is I have several years worth of instrument racks I have created.  Instrument Racks are Live's way of creating preset layers.  It is similar to Unify.  Create layers, define keyboard ranges, add effects to overall output or to specific layers, etc.  Most of my Instrument Racks are using the effects in the VSTs themselves, so these are a matter of time/effort to just sit down and convert them directly to Unify.  But I also have several using Ableton's built-in effects and these will be a bit more difficult to convert without buying new VST effects.  Live has EQ8 which allows for 8 points, different EQ curves (shelf, notch, bell, etc.), has a visual analyzer among other options as well.  I also have an Ableton effect rack (like an instrument rack but for effects) that simulates a shimmer, which I don't believe Unify can produce without having a pitch shifter.  Although Valhalla Shimmer has been on my radar for years.

None of this has stopped me from using Unify.  I'm just using it within Live.  It has already become part of my normal routine.

*Regarding arming a track, it gets a bit muddy when talking about multiple keyboards.

Ableton Live 10, Omnisphere, Native Instruments, Diva, SynthMaster, Alchemy 1.55, Addictive Keys, Unify


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